The Green-Eyed Monster: Jealousy in the Time of Quarantine: Nancy Stohlman guests on Jane Friedman

Read full article on Jane Friedman.com

An excerpt:

One good thing about a year’s worth of quarantine? A lot less FOMO. We’re less afraid of missing out because everyone is missing out. We aren’t worried about being left off the guest list because there is no guest list. And for many of us who were trying to be everything to everyone, this has been a huge relief.

But…now that our attention and focus has been narrowed even more tightly to the screen, we might be noticing a different kind of FOMO creeping up. We’re maybe noticing there are other writers doing a lot during quarantine: publishing or producing with a seemingly endless supply of creative juice, while the project you were working on was cancelled, or postponed, or just feels irrelevant now in this plague world. Maybe all your writer friends seem inspired and you’re stuck. And you feel that nasty green-eyed monster putting his hand on his hips again.

I’m going to go out on a limb and suggest that, despite our very best efforts, artistic jealousy affects us all at one time or another. If you’ve never felt the green monster, then you’re a better person than me. Mind you, I genuinely like my colleagues and I want them all to succeed. Most days I subscribe to the “we all win when we all win” mentality, and I truly believe it’s the only way to have a long, rewarding artistic life.

But… no matter who you are, there is probably somebody out there who is kicking more butt than you, and it seems to be happening effortlessly.

What to do about it???

KEEP READING HERE

Sabotage Reviews: Neil Campbell’s Insightful Review of “Going Short”

An excerpt:

Read the entire review at Sabotage Reviews

This book could become the definitive introduction to the form. It’s admirably lean and devoid of ego.

“This is also a good book for creative writing courses and, even better, a book for that old fashioned entity, the solitary writer, the one excluded from academia by not having thousands of pounds.

You could read this book in an hour and go back to it for years. And there’s a hundred prompts at the back for those of you feigning ‘writer’s block’.”

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Join Me This Weekend: Readings and Readings and Workshops, oh my!

Need something to do this weekend? Next week? I’m going to be part of three virtual events and I’d love to see you at any of them!

Friday March 5th: Fbomb NYC Reading, 6-9 pm EST

Fbomb NYC: Friday, March 5 KGB Zoom FBomb reading Mar 5th 6pm est – 9 pm est. 

Featuring:

  1. Roberta Beary
  2. Andrea Marusco
  3. Nancy Ludmerer
  4. Jayne Martin
  5. Nancy Stohlman
  6. Kathy Fish
  7. Susan Weiman
  8. Hank Paper
  9. Linda Woolford
  10. Sally Reno
  11. Paul Beckman
  12. Cindy Rosmus

Contact Paul Beckman for Zoom link at: paul@paulbeckman.com

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Friday, March 5th: Bending Genres Reading @ SMOL Book Fair, 9 pm EST

More about Book Fair here

March 5, Friday, tomorrow, at 9pm EST.
Featuring: DOMINIQUE CHRISTINA! 💜💚❤️💚❤️💜
Also reading are:
AIMEE PARKISON
DESPY BOUTRIS
BILL SOLDAN
TOMMY DEAN
KIM MAGOWAN
KAJ TANAKA
NANCY STOHLMAN

PLUS GIVE-AWAY OF MERCH!
OPEN MIC TO FOLLOW FOR FIRST FIVE TO SIGN-UP

More info here:

Reading Schedule

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March 9-13, Writer’s Studio Literary Festival at Arapahoe Community College

More info here

For $50 (lots of discounts available too), you have access to SIX instructional workshops, and four different readings, all virtual, so you can attend from anywhere. As a bonus, when you sign up, you will get a copy of the Progenitor Vol 55 mailed to you (the one published during the onset of the pandemic–it’s very good!).

AGAIN: NEXT WEEK March 9th through the 13th Please consider registering! https://www.arapahoe.edu/…/writers-studio-literary…Featuring: Hillary Leftwich, Nancy Stohlman, David R Slayton and others. That’s three sessions you’ll love right there: Fantasy Writing, Flash Fiction Writing, and Writing About Your Ghosts

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Hope to see you soon at a virtual writing event soon!

xoxo Nancy

The Short of It: The Origin Story of Going Short and the Changing Landscape of Flash

Curtis Smith is an amazing interviewer. Here’s a little excerpt from our conversation at JMWW where we talk about origin stories, including the genesis of Going Short, my time co-founding/running Fast Forward Press, and how ultimately most books are smarter than we are.

Read the full interview at JMWW

Nancy Stohlman has been writing, publishing, and teaching flash fiction for more than a decade, and her latest book, Going Short: An Invitation to Flash Fiction (Ad Hoc Fiction, 2020), is her treatise on the form.

Curtis Smith: Congratulations on the publication of Going Short. Can you tell us a bit about the book’s origins—your motivations and how you came to work with Ad Hoc?

Nancy Stohlman: Thank you, Curtis. And I just want to say that the response to Going Short has been so heartwarming and validating in a year that was otherwise challenging. So thank you all for that.

The book has been simmering for a long time, over 10 years. I think sometimes we’re called to write books that are smarter than we are, so it basically took me 10 years to catch up. There were (and still are) very few flash fiction specific books, and I wanted to write a craft book (as opposed to a straight textbook)—I envisioned it like having a long conversation about flash fiction with a fellow writer. Ad Hoc was a natural choice; I first collaborated with them at the Flash Fiction Festival in the UK in 2018, and I have always been impressed by their vision of a flash fiction community—a vision I share. It seemed like (and has been) a natural and perfect fit for this book.

CS: You’ve been writing flash for a long time. Who were your influences? What initially drew you to the form. How has the form (and market) changed?

NS: Running a flash fiction press before flash fiction had really “caught on” was enormously influential in my education and trajectory. In 2007, during graduate school at Naropa’s Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics (I never get tired of saying that name!), a group of us co-founded Fast Forward Press, and then from 2008-2013 we put out a yearly print flash fiction anthology as well as some early flash novels. So much of my education came from reading and analyzing hundreds of story submissions, both the ones I loved and the ones we rejected. We had many spirited conversations about was is/isn’t flash fiction, what constituted a story. At that time our answers were purely instinctual, but I see now that we were helping to define the genre in those early stages.

The flash fiction landscape has changed quite a bit, even in the last decade, but I think the work we did there laid much groundwork, including acting as a honing signal for other early flash fiction writers. More than a dozen years after our first anthologies, I can flip through the Tables of Contents and see so many flash fiction giants and friends, names like Kim Chinquee, Robert Scotellaro, Meg Tuite, Chris Bowen, Jane Anne Phillips, Tom Hazuka, Sally Reno—and you!

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Find out more about Going Short